Cardiology

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DETERMINING HEART DISEASE RISK IN TYPE 1 DIABETES PATIENTS

Predicting the chances of someone developing a disease is not an exact science, but researchers from Pittsburgh say comparing the ratio of harmful factors with protective ones may give a more accurate picture. In a study to find out how heart disease risks in patients with type 1 diabetes can be better assessed, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health looked to evidence collected between 1950 and 1980.


10% OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE NOT INHERITED FROM PARENTS

Ten percent of babies born with congenital heart disease have genetic mutations that occurred while they were in the womb, i.e. they did not inherited the genetic mutations from their parents, researchers reported in the May 12th issue of the journal Nature. Thousands of children are born annually with severely malformed hearts.


FOOD SUPPLEMENT COQ10 CUTS DEATH RATES AMONG HEART FAILURE PATIENTS

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) cuts mortality by half in patients with heart failure, researchers from Denmark reported at the annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, which took place in Lisbon, Portugal this year. Professor Svend Aage Mortensen and team explained that Coq10 is the first medication to improve heart failure mortality in over ten years and should be included in standard treatment.


HEART ATTACK HOSPITALIZATIONS IN CHINA QUADRUPLE OVER 10 YEARS

Research published in The Lancet has found that between 2001 and 2011, hospitalizations in China for the most severe type of heart attack quadrupled, from 3.7 to 15.8 admissions per 100,000 people. The type of heart attack in question is an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), defined by the American Heart Association (AHA) as "a severe heart attack caused by a prolonged period of blocked blood supply that affects a large area of the heart.


CHILDREN IN THE US: 1 IN 3 MAY HAVE HIGH CHOLESTEROL

Approximately 1 in 3 children in the US may have borderline or high cholesterol, according to a new study recently presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The research team, led by Dr. Thomas Seery, pediatric cardiologist at Texas Children's Hospital and assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, analyzed the medical records of 12,712 children aged between 9 and 11 years who were screened for cholesterol levels during a routine physical examination at Texas Children's Pediatrics Associates clinics.


ANGINA HAS FALLEN OVER PAST 2 DECADES 'AMONG WHITE - BUT NOT BLACK - AMERICANS'

Reported incidence of angina or chest pain has fallen over the last 2 decades in seniors aged 65 and older, and among white people 40 and older, but there has been no change in angina rates for black people. So claims new research from the American Heart Association, which is published in their journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.


HEART RISK: 9/11 RESCUERS MORE LIKELY TO HAVE SLEEP APNEA AND PTSD

When the World Trade Center towers collapsed on September 11, 2001, people who rushed to the scene in rescue efforts were probably not thinking about their long-term health risks. But now, nearly 13 years later, research suggests first responders at Ground Zero exposed to inhaled particulates have increased risks of obstructed sleep apnea and post-traumatic stress order.


NEW DRUG '20% MORE EFFECTIVE THAN ACE INHIBITORS' FOR TREATING HEART FAILURE

For treating patients with chronic heart failure, ACE inhibitors are usually the first port of call. But a new study claims an experimental drug called LCZ696 performs around 20% better than ACE inhibitors when it comes to reducing rates of hospitalizations and deaths due to chronic heart failure. A new study claims an experimental drug called LCZ696 reduced rates of hospitalizations and deaths from chronic heart failure by around 20%, compared with ACE inhibitors.


1 IN 3 PEOPLE 'WOULD PREFER SHORTER LIFE' TO TAKING A PILL EVERY DAY

Should all older people take a daily pill to prevent heart attacks? It is an enduring question, even though the Food and Drug Administration currently says that a daily aspirin, for example, is not for everyone. Researchers are also continuing to investigate the idea of a daily "polypill" against cardiovascular disease in certain groups.


ADULTS IN THEIR 50S SHOULD TAKE ASPIRIN DAILY FOR HEART ATTACK, STROKE PREVENTION

Updated guidelines issued by the US Preventive Services Task Force recommend daily low-dose aspirin for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among adults aged 50-59 who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The new guidelines say a daily aspirin may prevent first stroke or heart attack for adults aged 50-59.


COMMON ANTACID COULD RAISE HEART ATTACK RISK BY MORE THAN 20%

Proton pump inhibitors are a form of antacid drug commonly taken by adults for a range of health conditions. However, a new study suggests people may need to be cautious of their use, finding that adults using the drug are 16-21% more likely to have a heart attack than people not using the antacid. PPIs are some of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the world but are also available for purchase over the counter.


FOR-PROFIT HEALTH: SOME US HOSPITALS MARK UP COSTS BY 1,000%

The health care industry is a major market in which consumers are typically not able to comparison shop. A patient lying in a hospital bed, for example, has little choice in how much they spend on their care. Now, a new study examining hospital costs finds that the 50 hospitals in the US with the highest markup of prices are charging patients more than 10 times that allowed by Medicare.


STUDY FINDS INCREASED RISK OF TYPE 2 DIABETES WITH STATIN USE

A new study published in the journal Diabetologia finds the use of statins - drugs commonly used to lower cholesterol - may significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, and that this risk remains even after accounting for confounding factors, including age, smoking status and body mass index. The researchers found statin therapy was associated with a 46% increased risk of type 2 diabetes, even after adjustment for confounding factors.


10% PRICE CUT ON FRUITS AND VEG 'COULD PREVENT THOUSANDS OF HEART DEATHS'

Reducing the price of fruits, vegetables and grains and increasing the price of sugary drinks by 10% could prevent more than half a million deaths from cardiovascular disease in the US by 2035. This is according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions in Phoenix, AZ.


womenhealthsecret.com: 2016 CARDIOLOGY YEAR IN REVIEW

Researchers have made huge strides in the field of cardiology in 2016, bringing us closer to better preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease. But which studies have stood out this year? Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number 1 killer across the globe, accounting for around 31 percent of all deaths in 2012.


EATING THE RIGHT FATS COULD SAVE 1 MILLION LIVES PER YEAR

According to research carried out by the American Heart Association, replacing refined carbohydrates and saturated fats with vegetable oils could save 1 million lives per year. New research plots the state of the world diet and its ramifications for global heart health. The association between eating a diet high in saturated fats and heart disease is well documented.


HEART FAILURE: FAULTY GENE CARRIED BY 1 PERCENT OF PEOPLE

Around 1 percent of people - 75 million worldwide - carry faulty versions of a gene for a protein called titin that could trigger heart failure if the organ comes under stress, such as during pregnancy, a viral infection, or with high blood pressure. The main pumping chamber in the hearts of healthy people with the titin mutation are slightly bigger, study finds.


IRREGULAR HEARTBEAT RISK INCREASES FOR 1 YEAR AFTER DEATH OF A PARTNER

Dealing with the loss of a loved one is one of life's toughest challenges. It can cause severe psychological stress, which studies have shown can raise the risk of acute cardiovascular problems. Now, new research finds the risk of irregular heartbeat - a key risk factor for stroke and heart failure - may be increased for up to 1 year after the death of a partner.


VIAGRA MAY BENEFIT HEART HEALTH FOR MEN WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

Diabetes is a known risk factor for poor cardiovascular health; studies have suggested people with the condition are almost 50 percent more likely to have a heart attack than those without diabetes. But for men with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds that the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra may lower the risk of heart attack, as well as increase the likelihood of surviving one.


AFTER SEVERE HEART ATTACK WOMEN GET LESS NEEDED HOSPITAL TREATMENT AND MORE LIKELY TO DIE

A new US study suggests that following a severe heart attack, women are less likely to get the care they need in hospital at the time they need it and they are more likely to die compared to men. The study was the work of Dr Hani Jneid, lead author and assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and colleagues.