Cardiology

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Among doctors and the public alike, there is a popular belief that dietary saturated fat clogs up the arteries and results in coronary heart disease. A new editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine says that this notion of saturated fat clogging a pipe is "just plain wrong." According to researchers, 'the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong.

Disease

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The word bacteria is the plural of bacterium. Grammatically the headline should just say "What are bacteria?" The incorrect usage has been included in the headline to remind readers that it is wrong - and hopefully help correct an increasingly common mistake in the English language. Bacteria are tiny living beings (microorganisms) - they are neither plants nor animals - they belong to a group all by themselves.

Medical practice

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DiGeorge syndrome, otherwise referred to as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a chromosomal disorder that typically affects the 22nd chromosome at the q11.2 location, with as many as 90% of cases exhibiting this deletion feature. 1-3 This condition has also been known as velocardiofacial syndrome, conotruncal syndrome, Shprintzen syndrome and CATCH22, as well as many others.

Other

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The results of a small study bring some positive news for men with low sexual desire; they suggest light therapy - exposure to bright artificial light, often used to treat seasonal affective disorder - could also boost men's libido. Researchers suggest men with low sexual desire may benefit from light therapy.

Psychiatry

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The age-old use of food comparisons to describe the smells and appearances of disease should be given a resurgence in the medical literature, a pathologist has said, using a journal article to list examples - from a "fish mouth" appearance of heart valves to a smell of rotten eggs in burps. The paper - Medical Humanities.

Retirees

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New research suggests that exercise programs aimed at preventing falls in older adults may also prevent injuries caused by falls. This is according to a study published in the BMJ. Researchers from France say their findings suggest that health care providers should encourage elderly patients to take part in exercise fall-prevention programs.

Women health

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Two new studies state that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been proven to help treat menopause symptoms, including night sweats and hot flushes. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a method using a psychotherapeutic approach - a talking approach. Both studies, which were conducted by Professor Myra Hunter from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, and team, determined that CBT works as a safe substitute for the more the commonly used treatment: hormone replacement therapy (HRT).