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LONELINESS CAN ADD 30 POINTS TO YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE IF YOU ARE OVER 50

A study conducted at the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago has found that if you are over 50 and lonely you could be adding 30 points to your blood pressure and raising significantly your chances of suffering from hypertension. The increase in blood pressure due to loneliness was present after taking into account a person's emotional state (how sad or stressed the person was).


AGING NOT SLOWED BY ANTIOXIDANTS, STUDY REJECTS 50 YEAR OLD THEORY

Research led by scientists in the UK has upturned a 50-year old theory that maintains antioxidants stop or slow aging by counteracting the oxidative stress on cells caused by free radicals, a finding that will undermine claims made by beauty and diet products that promote the anti-aging properties of antioxidants.


RESEARCH PROJECT TO GIVE PEOPLE "50 ACTIVE YEARS AFTER THE AGE OF 50" LAUNCHED IN UK

Recently published research suggests that more than half of babies now born in wealthier nations will reach the age of 100, but unless we do something about it, their bodies will still degenerate at the same rate with age and their extra years will be accompanied by poor quality of life, so a new 50 million pound project was launched in the UK this week to find ways to give people "50 active years after 50".


ELDERLY WITH LOW VITAMIN B12 RISK BRAIN SHRINKAGE AND COGNITIVE DECLINE

Elderly individuals with low blood vitamin B12 levels have a greater risk of brain shrinkage and losing their cognitive skills, researchers from Rush University Medical Center, Chicago reported in the journal Neurology. Foods rich in vitamin B12 are mainly from animals and include, eggs, milk, liver, meat, and fish.


$430 MILLION FALSE BILLING MEDICARE FRAUD, 91 PEOPLE CHARGED

Ninety-one people from seven US cites have been charged with $430 million's worth of Medicare fraud, the Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Attorney General Eric Holder and Health announced today. People being charged include nurses, doctors and other certified health care professionals.


HEALTH CARE FRAUD, RECORD $4.2 BILLION RECOVERED IN 2012, USA

Health and Human Services and the Department of Justice say that a record-breaking $4.2 billion were recovered as a result of joint efforts to address health care fraud in 2012. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Attorney General Eric Holder issued a report which showed that for every dollar the US government spent on health care-related fraud and abuse investigations over the last 36 months, it got $7.


TACKLE AGING, NOT CANCER AND HEART DISEASE, FOR 'BETTER RETURNS'

Medical research that brings about a delay to the aging process would represent a "better investment" than tackling specific diseases, such as cancer and heart disease, an economic analysis claims. In terms of its impact on longevity, disability and major entitlement program costs, finding a way to delay aging makes better sense than targeting specific conditions, say the researchers publishing in the journal Health Affairs.


COGNITIVE DECLINE HASTENED WITH GREATER FLUCTUATIONS IN BLOOD PRESSURE

Older adults who experience greater fluctuations in blood pressure over 5 years may be subject to faster cognitive decline, suggests a new study published in the journal Hypertension. Researchers say controlling blood pressure variability may preserve cognitive function. Blood pressure is the strength with which blood pushes against the walls of the arteries.


COULD DIETARY FIBER BE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL AGING?

Findings from a new study that followed older adults for 10 years supports the idea that eating a diet rich in fiber - such as found in breads, cereals, and fruits - is key to aging successfully; that is, reaching old age free of disease and disability. The researchers found participants who had the highest intake of fiber were nearly 80 percent more likely to age successfully over a 10-year follow-up.


AGING DOES NOT NECESSARILY PRECLUDE HEALTHY ARTERIES

The results of a new study suggest that it is possible for seniors to maintain a healthy heart as they age, by following recommendations from the American Heart Association. Research tells us that living in a Western culture makes it unlikely that people in their 70s can have arteries as healthy as those of people in their 20s and 30s.


CELLS THAT RETAIN THEIR WASTE DISPOSAL PROTEINS APPEAR TO LIVE LONGER

US researchers studying yeast cells found that ageing cells able to retain a group of proteins that ferry compounds across cellular membranes and get rid of toxic waste have a longer lifespan in that they can produce more copies of themselves compared with cells that lose their waste disposal proteins; they also hope their finding may help us better understand stem cells and cancer cells.


COULD DIABETES PILL METFORMIN WORK AGAINST AGING?

Researchers have discovered that a pill used to treat type 2 diabetes has improved health and lifespan in middle-aged male mice. The study was recently published in Nature Communications. Researchers at the National Institute of Aging (NIA), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US, tested the type 2 diabetes drug metformin on the mice.


HAVE HUMANS REACHED THE MAXIMUM LIFESPAN?

Research, published this week in Nature, argues that humans have already achieved their maximum possible lifespan. The investigators believe that the oldest people on record have hit the ceiling of longevity. New research challenges the notion that lifespan will increase indefinitely. Alongside improvements in healthcare and diet, the human lifespan has steadily increased.


IMPACT OF AGING POPULATION 'EXAGGERATED,' SAY RESEARCHERS

Federal representatives have long spoken out regarding the impact of the aging population in developed countries, stating that the increase in people living over the age of 65 will strain the economy and health care systems. But according to an analysis published in the BMJ, this impact has been "exaggerated" and the population is actually getting younger.


IN WOMEN, AGE-RELATED COGNITIVE DECLINE MAY START SOONER THAN WE THINK

With age, our cognitive abilities slowly begin to deteriorate. Age-related cognitive decline is a normal process that, as new research suggests, may start earlier than we previously thought. A new study suggests that in women, cognitive decline may start in midlife. As people begin to live longer lives, it has become increasingly important to understand age-related cognitive decline.


MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXERCISES MAY PROTECT AGAINST COGNITIVE DECLINE IN THE ELDERLY

The results of the first ever randomized controlled trial investigating a comprehensive program to slow cognitive decline among older people have been published in The Lancet. The intervention included muscle and cardiovascular training, mental exercises and advice on how to manage metabolic and vascular risk factors.


NATURALLY OCCURRING COMPOUNDS COULD BLOCK PROTEIN BEHIND AGE-RELATED MUSCLE LOSS

Researchers from the University of Iowa have identified a protein that causes age-related muscle weakness and loss, as well as two natural compounds that reduce this protein's activity. Tomatidine, one of the two compounds that inhibit ATF4, can be found naturally occurring in green tomatoes. The study, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, offers the first example of a protein associated with age-related muscle wasting, and could lead toward new forms of treatment.


OLDER PEOPLE ARE HAVING SEX, AND LOVING IT

According to a study published on bmj.com, the number of 70 year olds that are having sex - and saying it is good sex - is increasing. Further, more older women are indicating specific satisfaction with their sex lives. Much of the research on sexual activity concerns younger people, and our objective knowledge about sexual behaviors among older people is quite limited.


PROBIOTICS DO NOT TREAT DIARRHEA, STUDY SAYS

Probiotic supplements do not prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea in elderly patients, according to a study published in The Lancet. Previous research has suggested that probiotic supplements may curb antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and many institutions prescribe these as part of normal practice.