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JUST 51% OF US ADULTS MARRIED TODAY, COMPARED TO 72% FIFTY YEARS AGO

The proportion of American adults who are married today is the lowest ever, according to a new report published by Pew Research. Not only is marriage becoming progressively avoided, the authors added, but also people are waiting longer to tie the traditional knot. The average age for getting married is now 26.


MULTIVITAMINS AND VITAMIN D PLACE SECOND, THIRD; FISH OIL BIG USAGE WINNER 2010

Vitamins are popular and beneficial, and vitamin D came out the winner in 2010 as the "most used single vitamin" at 56.2% usage amongst those surveyed, and also won the "most improved" category with a 52% increase in usage since 2008. Multivitamins are used by 70% of the population, but this amount has dropped from 72% in 2009.


3,000 STEPS FIVE DAYS A WEEK WARDS OFF DIABETES

If you walk three thousand steps a day, five days each week, your chances of developing diabetes and becoming obese are significantly reduced, Australian researchers report in the BMJ (British Medical Journal). Increase your daily steps over a five year period to 10,000 steps a day, and the benefits skyrocket.


18% OF DEATHS AMONG UNDER 5S CAUSED BY PNEUMONIA GLOBALLY

Of the 7.6 million deaths worldwide among children under 5 years of age in 2010, 18% were caused by pneumonia, while 14% were the result of a complication of a preterm birth, researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an international team of experts reported in The Lancet.


NO WHOOPING COUGH DEATHS IN CALIFORNIA IN 2011

There were no reported cases of whooping cough deaths in the State of California in 2011, says the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) - the first time this has occurred in two decades. Californian health officials say this is due to three factors: 1. Higher vaccination rates. 2. Greater awareness of the disease, and 3.


OVER 1 IN EVERY 10 BABIES BORN PREMATURE GLOBALLY

More than 10% of babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to a new report issued by Save the Children, WHO (The World Health Organization), The March of Dimes, and Newborn & Child Health. The report, called "Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth", informs that over 1 million premature babies die soon after they are born, while several million more suffer from physical, neurological or educational disabilities.


GENE SCIENTIST MAPS OWN TYPE 2 DIABETES ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE

In a landmark study for the field of personalized medicine, using "Personal Omics Profiling" a Stanford geneticist and his colleagues, analyzed his genome to predict a genetic disposition to type 2 diabetes, tracked at the molecular level how it developed in his body, and then went away again after dietary and lifestyle changes.


ARANESP MISBRANDING - AMGEN AGREES $762 MILLION PAYMENT

After being found guilty of promoting off-label use of Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa), an anemia drug, Amgen Inc. agreed to pay $150 million in criminal fines and penalties. Prosecutors added that the company will also pay $612 in civil settlements. The settlement would include a payment to a former Aranesp product manager, Kassie Westmoreland, to resolve a whistleblower lawsuit.


THALIDOMIDE APOLOGY 50 YEARS LATER

Gruenenthal Group's CRO has apologized to mothers who took Thalidomide in the 1950s and 1960s and gave birth to children with congenital birth defects. Exactly 50 years ago today, Thalidomide was pulled off the market. In the 1950s and 1960s, Thalidomide was approved in 46 countries for the treatment of morning sickness during pregnancy, as well as aiding sleep.


INCREDIBLE 200LB TUMOR REMOVED FROM MAN'S LEG

In something that looks and sounds more like an episode of a science fiction show, than medical science, a thirty two year old man from Vietnam survived a 12 hour operation to remove an enormous tumor from his leg. McKay McKinnon a U.S. surgeon, headed up the team of eight who spent an entire day operating on Nguyen Duy Hai earlier this week.


2 CUPS OF MILK A DAY IS BEST FOR KIDS

Children should not drink more than two cups of milk per day. This new finding came from a team of scientists at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario and was published in the journal Pediatrics. The study was able to show parents that two cups of milk provide children with a sufficient amount of Vitamin D and iron without resulting in any adverse reactions.


CHILDREN WITH TRISOMY 13 AND 18 ARE HAPPY DESPITE POPULAR BELIEFS

Trisomies 13 and 18 are rare chromosome disorders, which are predominantly diagnosed prior to a child's birth and sometimes after. Children with trisomy 13 or 18 generally do not survive beyond their first year of life, and those who do are severely disabled and only live a short life. When diagnosed before birth, parents often decide to have an abortion, whilst those who continue the pregnancy often have a miscarriage.


INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY MAY BE CAUSED BY TOO MUCH PROTEIN HUWE1

An intellectual disability is present in 2 to 3% of babies at birth, possibly by a genetic defect, but scientists have been unsure exactly what genes are responsible in 80% of these cases. According to VIB researchers at KU Leuven, the cause in some patients is an increased production of the HUEW1 protein.


PREMATURE BABY GETS PACEMAKER 15 MINUTES AFTER BIRTH

Jaya Maharaj, a baby girl born 9 weeks early with a congenital heart defect was fitted with a pacemaker just 15 minutes after birth. Weighing only 3.5 pounds (1.6 kg), she was delivered by cesarean section at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, California, in November last year. Jaya, born to parents Leanne and Kamneel Maharaj of Hayward, also in California, is thought to be the smallest patient noted in the medical literature ever to receive a pacemaker.


US TEEN PREGNANCIES AT 40-YEAR LOW

In 2008, rates of teen pregnancies in the US reached their lowest level in nearly 40 years. Since their peak in the early 1990s, they have fallen dramatically, as have rates of resulting births and abortions, according to a new report released this week from the Guttmacher Institute, a not-for-profit sexual health research group whose analysis finds that rates are down among all racial and ethnic groups, although disparities remain.


WHOOPING COUGH VACCINE EFFECTIVENESS FADES FROM AGES 8 TO 12

Although vaccines against Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes pertussis (whooping cough) are widespread, it is still a prevalent disease, researchers from Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, San Rafael, CA, USA, reported in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. As background information, the authors explained that several experts had been wondering whether acellular vaccine might not be as long-lasting as had been previously thought.


SURGICAL ERRORS OCCUR MORE THAN 4,000 TIMES A YEAR IN THE U.S.

Events that should never occur in surgery ("never events") happen at least 4,000 times a year in the U.S. according to research from Johns Hopkins University. The findings, published in Surgery, is the first of its kind to reveal the true extent of the prevalence of "never events" in hospitals through analysis of national malpractice claims.


£40M OWED BY NHS TOURISTS IN UNPAID FEES, UK

According to an investigation conducted by Pulse, hospitals are owed as much as £40m in outstanding fees for treating foreign nationals. The results will most likely fuel the debate over health tourism again and expose incidents in which GPs were under pressure to register foreign nationals who are not eligible to receive secondary care.


40% OF MEDICAL STUDENTS UNCONSCIOUSLY BIASED AGAINST OBESE PEOPLE

According to new research carried out by scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, forty percent of medical students are unconsciously biased against obese people. The study, published in the Journal of Academic Medicine, revealed that doctors generally have an anti-fat bias which results in obese people not receiving the same level of respect as slim people.


7 IN 10 AMERICANS TRACK HEALTH

The first national US survey to measure health data tracking finds 70% of American adults track at least one health indicator either for themselves or a loved one, although half of "trackers" report they do it "in their heads". The Pew Research Center study, which was released online on Monday, carried out telephone interviews with over 3,000 adults living in the US.