Cardiology

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CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS MAY INCREASE HEART ATTACK RISK

An analysis of data on nearly 24,000 people followed for over a decade suggests taking calcium supplements may increase the risk of having a heart attack. This is the main finding of a study published online this week in the journal Heart that also concludes boosting overall calcium intake through dietary sources brings no significant benefit in terms of reducing risk of heart disease or stroke.


CARDIAC MUSCLE PATCH SUCCEEDS IN ANIMALS

Scientists in Israel have successfully grown heart muscle in the abdomen and then used it to patch and repair the hearts of rats after they had suffered heart attack. This is the first study to show it is possible to improve the health of a heart after it has been damaged through heart attack. The experiment was conducted by lead author Dr Tal Dvir, of the Department of Biotechnology Engineering at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer-Sheva, Israel and colleagues, and appears in the 24 August online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS.


CATHETER ABLATION HELPS ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS LIVE LONGER

A new long-term study suggests that adult patients with atrial fibrillation whose heart rhythm is successfully restored with a minimally invasive procedure called catheter ablation, have a significantly reduced chance of early death from a heart attack or heart failure. "The study findings show the benefit of catheter ablation extends beyond improving quality of life for adults with atrial fibrillation," say the researchers.


DEMENTIA RISKS RISE WITH OVERUSE OF ANTI-STROKE DUAL-DRUG COMBO

A new study investigating the long-term usage of the anti-clotting drug warfarin in conjunction with antiplatelet therapy using aspirin or clopidogrel has bad news for people with atrial fibrillation. Long-term overtreatment with this combination of medication could increase the risk of dementia in these patients.


A HEALTHY HEART TODAY MEANS A HEALTHIER BRAIN LATER IN LIFE

Heart health and brain volume are linked in a new study. Research published today in the journal Neurology finds that maintaining a healthy heart in your 20s can give you a higher chance of having a healthy brain in your 40s. Successfully maintaining a healthy heart is known to significantly reduce the risk of developing a range of health conditions later in life.


HEART ATTACK OR HEARTBURN? DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TYPES OF CHEST PAIN

Anyone worried about chest pain should not wait to get urgent medical care. They should call for an ambulance straight away, especially if the pain is unexplained, sudden, or severe. Heart attack pain is caused when one of the arteries supplying the heart becomes blocked. Angina is a similar chest pain caused when these arteries are narrowed by heart disease.


¿QUÉ ES LA FRECUENCIA CARDIACA? ¿CUÁL ES LA NORMAL?

La frecuencia cardiaca es uno de nuestros signos vitales y se define como el número de veces por minuto que nuestro corazón late o se contrae. 1 La frecuencia cardiaca varía, tenemos una frecuencia cardíaca en reposo, que como su nombre indica, es el ritmo al cual el corazón late cuando estamos relajados La frecuencia cardiaca se incrementa con el esfuerzo, con el objetivo de proveer de más oxigeno y energía para la actividad que se esté desempeñando.


MID-RANGE 'GOOD' CHOLESTEROL LEVELS ASSOCIATED WITH LONGER LIFE

Intermediate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may help people have a longer life, finds a new study published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Low and high levels of HDL cholesterol increase the risk, while intermediate HDL cholesterol levels decrease the risk of premature death.


CYCLING TO WORK MAY REDUCE HEART DISEASE RISK

Cycling to work is an important strategy for preventing cardiovascular risk factors that could lead to heart disease, find two separate studies published simultaneously in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation and Journal of the American Heart Association. Switching from driving to cycling to work may lower the risk of heart disease.


HEART ATTACK PATIENTS WHO RECEIVE BLOOD TRANSFUSION HAVE HIGHER MORTALITY RISK

Heart attack patients who receive a blood transfusion are at a much higher risk of death than those who don't receive one, according to a report published in Archives of Internal Medicine. Anticoagulant and anti platelet drugs are often used to treat acute coronary syndrome which typically occurs during a heart attack.


HOT FLASHES MAY INDICATE HEART DISEASE RISK

A new study finds a link between the common hot flashes experienced by most women around the time of their menopause, and vascular health. The study suggests that hot flashes may indicate a higher risk of heart disease. New research suggests that hot flashes may signal heart disease in younger women.


HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MAY BE MORE COMMON IN YOUNG AMERICAN ADULTS THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

Nearly one in five young American adults may have high blood pressure, much more than previously thought, according to a study that challenges the widely held view that the figure is under one in twenty; but even if it is actually somewhere in between, the researchers say young adults and their doctors should not assume high blood pressure only occurs in older people.


HYPERTENSION POORLY CONTROLLED BY 53% OF AMERICANS

Of the 66.9 million Americans with high blood pressure, 53.5% do not have their hypertension under control, says a new report issued by the CDC (MMWR report). Hypertension means high blood pressure. The authors added that 39.4% (14.1 million) of Americans with hypertension are unaware of their condition.


STATINS 'REVERSE' NOONAN SYNDROME LEARNING DISABILITIES

Commonly used to lower "bad" cholesterol, statins are also effective at reversing learning disabilities caused by a genetic mutation, according to a new mouse trial. The mice treated with lovastatin had a drop in Ras activity and a corresponding improvement in their ability to navigate mazes and remember objects.


RESEARCHERS UNCOVER 'PREDICTORS OF ADHERENCE TO STATIN THERAPY'

Past research has suggested that up to 46% of individuals prescribed statins for high cholesterol do not adhere to the therapy, increasing their risk of cardiovascular events. But a new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) details lifestyle factors that may predict whether an individual is likely to stick to statin therapy.


EQUIVALENCE BETWEEN EVLT AND HLS FOR VARICOSE VEIN TREATMENT

A report published Online First by Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals indicates that endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) as well as high ligation and stripping (HLS) are both linked to effective and safe treatment of insufficiency of the great saphenous vein (GSV), but EVLT is more frequently linked to recurrences.


ASPIRIN RESISTANCE IS EXTREMELY RARE

Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is very rare, despite various estimates that have been put forward over the last few years, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania reported in the journal Circulation. The authors say that the incidence of aspirin resistance is so low as to be considered nonexistent.


ADOPT A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE: YOUR HEART WILL LOVE YOU FOR IT

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 17 million people around the world die from cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke, every year. Around 1 million of these deaths occur in the US alone - the equivalent to one death every 33 seconds. With figures like these, it is no surprise that heart disease is the main cause of death in the US.


ADRENAL TUMORS: HORMONE SECRETION LINKED TO CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

New research suggests that patients with adrenal tumors that secrete a hormone called cortisol are at higher risk of suffering cardiovascular events and increased mortality. Investigators say their findings may lead to better clinical management of patients with these tumors. This is according to a new study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.


AHA FIGHT AGAINST WOMEN'S HEART DISEASE; NATION PAINTS TOWN RED FRIDAY

The nation will paint itself red this Friday, February 4th, in an effort to show support for the battle against women's heart disease in particular. In conjunction with national sponsor Merck & Co., the American Heart Association Go Red For Women movement is leading the effort to build research channels and awareness of this disease that is the number one killer in women.