Cardiology

Womenhealthsecret.com

HEART DISEASE PATIENTS HAVE ARTERIES 40 YEARS OLDER THAN THEIR REAL AGE

Scientists from Cambridge University, UK, have found that people with advanced heart disease have arteries with the DNA damage of people 40 years older. In other words, the arteries of a patient with advanced heart disease are biologically 40 years older than the patient. The scientists found evidence of telomere damage in the smooth muscle cells of diseased blood vessels.


50,000 ANGIOPLASTIES EACH YEAR OF NO BENEFIT

Tens of thousands of angioplasty procedures carried out each year in the USA after heart attacks are not only a waste of time and resources, but they could also be dangerous for the patients, say experts after looking at 2,166 cases. You can read about this new report in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).


15 PER CENT OF CHINESE HAVE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

China's Health Ministry said on Tuesday that 15 per cent of people living in China, that is about 200 million of the population, have high blood pressure or hypertension. According to figures on a Chinese government website, only 1 in 3 of Chinese affected by high blood pressure is aware of it, and of these only 25 per cent sought treatment and a meagre 6 per cent got it under control.


5 IN 1 POLYPILL MAY SIGNIFICANTLY CUT HEART RISK IN HEALTHY PEOPLE

A study conducted in India suggested taking a single capsule containing five drugs: a statin, aspirin and three blood pressure drugs, could significantly cut the risk of heart disease among healthy people without side effects. The phase II clinical trial was the work of principal investigator Dr Salim Yusuf of McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues, and the findings appear in the 30 March online issue of The Lancet.


AORTIC STENOSIS SURGERY TO TRANSFORM BY 2015

Medical advances continue to shape the treatment and management of life threatening diseases specific to the human heart. Such is the case for patients diagnosed with aortic stenosis, a life-threatening disease in which a heart valve narrows due to calcification, wear or infection. Ultimately, aortic valve stenosis can lead to thickening of the cardiac muscle and heart failure.


MIDDLE AGED MEN LOSE 10 TO 15 YEARS OF LIFE IF THEY SMOKE, HAVE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND CHOLESTEROL, LARGE STUDY

Middle aged men who smoke, have high blood pressure and high cholesterol can expect to live 10 to 15 years less than their healthy counterparts, according to a large UK study that followed nearly 19,000 men for 38 years. These are the conclusions of a study published 17 September in the British Medical Journal, BMJ.


OTAMIXABAN MAY BE A USEFUL ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT FOR PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES (SEPIA-ACS1 TIMI 42 STUDY)

An article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet reports that otamixaban is a potential new agent for patients with acute coronary syndromes, such as heart attacks or sudden worsening of angina. The article is the work of Dr Marc S Sabatine, TIMI Study Group, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, and colleagues.


30% DROP IN HEART DISEASE DEATHS IN CANADA OVER A DECADE

A new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) reports that the rates of death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease declined thirty percent over a ten year period in Canada. The findings draw attention to successful efforts to prevent heart disease, the leading cause of death globally.


SPACED PA 32540 WITH CLOPIDOGREL CUTS PHARMACODYNAMIC INTERACTION COMPARED WITH CONCURRENT ADMINISTRATION

Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with PA32540 and clopidogrel demonstrates a decrease in drug-drug interaction when spaced 10 hours apart in healthy volunteers, according to phase 1 results released at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2010. PA 32540 is an investigational coordinated-delivery tablet of immediate-release omeprazole (40 mg), layered around enteric-coated aspirin (325 mg).


HEART DISEASE RISK 60% HIGHER FOR PEOPLE WHO WORK OVERTIME

A study of 10,000 civil servants in London, England found that people who worked three or more hours longer than a normal 7-hour day had a 60% higher risk of developing heart related problems, such as death from heart disease, non-fatal heart attacks and angina. "The association between long hours and coronary heart disease was independent of a range of risk factors that we measured at the start of the study, such as smoking, being overweight, or having high cholesterol.


RISK OF DYING FROM CORONARY HEART DISEASE DROPS BY 50% IN USA

Americans have halved their risk of dying from coronary heart disease over the last two decades by smoking less, watching their cholesterol and reducing their high blood pressure. Even though current therapies for heart disease have also contributed towards the drop, by far the biggest factor has been preventing heart disease from developing in the first place.


ADDING NIACIN TO STATIN TREATMENT MAKES NO DIFFERENCE TO HEART ATTACK OR STROKE RISK - TRIAL STOPPED 18 MONTHS EARLY

A clinical trial which compared statin only treatment versus niacin combined with statins was stopped 18 months early because the combination treatment made no difference to the risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke and heart attacks, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute informed today.


NIACIN DOES NOT REDUCE STROKE OR HEART ATTACK RISK, TRIAL ENDED 18 MONTHS EARLY

Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, vitamin B 3 or vitamin PP does not protect patients with vascular and heart disease from stroke or heart attack. A clinical trial which compared combination niacin with a statin versus statins alone had to be ended 18 months early, according to Abbot Laboratories and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.


UNDERINSURED ADULTS ROSE FROM 16 MILLION TO 29 MILLION IN 7 YEARS

The number of adults whose health insurance was inadequate rose 80% from 2003 to 2010, according to a report by the Commonwealth Fund published in the journal Health Affairs. They added that the Affordable Care Act aims to bring down this number by 70%. The Commonwealth Fund defines underinsured adults as those who say yes to at least one of the following: Out-of-pocket family medical care spending makes up over 10% of income (not including premiums) Medical expenses that represent over 5% of income (in families whose income is below 200% of federal poverty level) In this study, the researchers gathered data from the Commonwealth Fund 2010 Health Insurance Survey, which included a telephone survey of 4,005 individuals aged 19+ years in mainland USA.


LOWER INCOME INDIVIDUALS HAVE 50% HIGHER RISK OF HEART DISEASE

According to a recent UC Davis study published online in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, people with lower socioeconomic status are at greater risk of developing heart disease compared to those who are wealthier or better educated. The likelihood of heart disease persists, even with long-term progress in addressing traditional risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol.


16 NEW GENE REGIONS THAT IMPACT ON BLOOD PRESSURE DISCOVERED

British, European and American researchers have discovered 16 new gene regions that play key roles in blood pressure levels, according to an article published in Nature Genetics and Nature. The articles were published by the International Consortium for Blood Pressure Genome-Wide Association Studies.


SEVIKAR HCT, 3-IN-1 HYPERTENSION PILL AVAILABLE NOW IN UK

An announcement has been made by Daiichi Sankyo UK that the first three-in-one bill (Sevikar HCT) to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) has been launched. In the UK, approximately 8.5 million individuals are affected with hypertension. As symptoms are rarely clear, the condition is known as the "silent killer.


26% OF WORKING AGE ADULTS IN USA LACK HEALTH INSURANCE

Just over one quarter (26%) of all Americans of working age in 2011 experienced a gap in health insurance cover, says a new report published by the Commonwealth Fund. The authors explained that in many cases, when people change their jobs or become unemployed, many of them lose health coverage. It can be extremely difficult to recover employer-sponsored health coverage after it is lost, the report showed.


SWIMMING LOWERED BLOOD PRESSURE IN SEDENTARY OVER 50S

Older adults who don't do much exercise, and whose blood pressure is getting to the point where they may need treatment, should perhaps consider swimming as a way to help bring it back down, at least that is what a small US study of sedentary over-50-year-olds might suggest. The study was published early online in The American Journal of Cardiology earlier this month.


ON-PUMP BYPASS & OFF-PUMP HAVE SIMILAR OUTCOMES AFTER 1 YEAR

Patients who undergo heart bypass surgery without a heart-lung machine do just as well after one year as those whose hearts were connected to a pump during the procedure. The finding came from a new study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session. CORONARY is a global, multi center trial comparing on-pump (with a heart-lung machine) to off-pump bypass surgery.